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The Parthenon

Marshall University's Student Newspaper

The Parthenon

Marshall University's Student Newspaper

The Parthenon

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Mayor Williams Delivers Final State of the City Address

“I’m left with very high expectations of where our city is headed in the coming years and decades,” Huntington Mayor Steve Williams said on Monday in his final State of the City address as he pursues his election for West Virginia Governor.

In the speech, Williams discussed the progress that he has seen over his time as mayor while also projecting a positive future ahead for the city.

“I’m proud of what we’ve been able to accomplish and what we still have left to do,” he said. “We have responded aggressively and intelligently to each of the challenges that we have faced, and we have demonstrated that we are a city of doers and builders.”

First elected in 2012, William’s became the first three-term mayor of Huntington after being reelected in 2016 and 2017. During this time, Williams oversaw over half a billion dollars in investments from state and federal government as well as renovations to the city, specifically downtown.

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“We have found a way to build our downtown into a masterpiece on a small canvas,” he said. “All of these efforts, great and small, have created the most dynamic and electric downtown in a 100-mile radius.”

The mayor also discussed his expectations for the 2025 fiscal year with continued funding for the local emergency services and city administrations while continuing funding for projects William’s proposed last year.

He went on to speak on the importance of arts and culture to Huntington, stating the importance of investing in arts and the success of summer concert series such as Ninth Street Live.

“Arts are a continued priority to make our neighborhoods livable,” he said. “We will seek to invest in our artistic and cultural pursuits.”

Williams closed his speech by expressing the importance of Black History Month and the legacy Huntington has in celebrating Black History through the city’s connection with Carter G. Woodson

“We must own Black History Month in Huntington, West Virginia,” Williams said. “Carter G. Woodson is our most prominent former resident and citizen. As the author and founder of Black History Month, celebrating Black History Month celebrates his influence and reminds each of us that we have the capacity to change the world from this community along the banks of the Ohio river.”

Williams announced his election bid for state governor last September in hopes to replace outgoing Gov. Jim Justice.

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