The Parthenon

No curtain. No scenery. Only acting.

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"Our Town" gives audience unique experience

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No curtain. No scenery. Only acting.

Fiona Reynolds, left, and Luke Matlock play Rebecca and George Gibbs respectively in ARTS Resources for the Tri-State’s production of Thornton Wilder’s “Our Town” at the ARTS Renaissance Center.

Fiona Reynolds, left, and Luke Matlock play Rebecca and George Gibbs respectively in ARTS Resources for the Tri-State’s production of Thornton Wilder’s “Our Town” at the ARTS Renaissance Center.

Kaitlyn Clay

Fiona Reynolds, left, and Luke Matlock play Rebecca and George Gibbs respectively in ARTS Resources for the Tri-State’s production of Thornton Wilder’s “Our Town” at the ARTS Renaissance Center.

Kaitlyn Clay

Kaitlyn Clay

Fiona Reynolds, left, and Luke Matlock play Rebecca and George Gibbs respectively in ARTS Resources for the Tri-State’s production of Thornton Wilder’s “Our Town” at the ARTS Renaissance Center.

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ARTS Resources for the Tri-State continues its  production of Thornton Wilder’s “Our Town” 8 p.m. Frid and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday at the Renaissance Ballroom in the old Huntington High School.

The play is performed with no set or props, leaving the main focus on the art of acting.

The play welcomes audience members to be right in the center of the action.

Much like a novel, the audience takes over where the author’s words stop”

— Stephen Vance

Director Stephen Vance, said because the show is focused solely on acting, it makes it that much more personal of an experience.

“Much like a novel, the audience takes over where the author’s words stop,” Vance said. “Instead of trying to build a drug store, livery stable, and houses on stage, the audience does that in their mind.”

Claire Freeman, an audience member, said it was a play she will not forget.

“I was shocked at the simplicity,” Freeman said. “It was great to experience acting that way. It had me imagining sets and scenes. No one is going to have the same experience, and I loved that.”

Due to the heavy focus on the acting, the actors had much more time to focus on their roles rather than help with building sets and getting props together.

Vance said the way this play is set up, forces the actors to have no safety net when it comes to their performances.

“If it is established that a window exists in a certain space or that a coffee is sitting in an exact location on a table that can’t be seen, everyone has to remain on the same page when referring to those elements,” Vance said. “If the world is real to the performers, it is real to the audience. If the world is real to the audience, then the story is real too.”

Tickets cost $30 for those who choose to have dinner and watch the show, and tickets for just the show cost $15.

Kaitlyn Clay can be contacted at [email protected]

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