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Thursday marks National Drink Wine Day in the midst of American Heart Month

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Thursday marks National Drink Wine Day in the midst of American Heart Month

Wine for sale during National Drink Wine Day at the westend Kroger's in Huntington, WV on February 18, 2016.

Wine for sale during National Drink Wine Day at the westend Kroger's in Huntington, WV on February 18, 2016.

Ryan Fischer

Wine for sale during National Drink Wine Day at the westend Kroger's in Huntington, WV on February 18, 2016.

Ryan Fischer

Ryan Fischer

Wine for sale during National Drink Wine Day at the westend Kroger's in Huntington, WV on February 18, 2016.

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February is American Heart Month and Thursday was National Drink Wine Day. Though some people may be skeptical, red wine has an impact on heart health. According to the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, red wine seems to have more heart-healthy benefits than other types of alcohol do.

Red wine contains antioxidants called polyphenols that may help protect the lining of blood vessels in your heart. There is a particular substance in red wine know as resveratrol that may be the single ingredient that protect blood vessels from damage, reduces cholesterol and prevents blood clots.

All alcohol in moderation can benefit your heart. People who drink red wine in moderate amounts seem to have a lower risk of heart disease. According to the Harvard School of Public Health, wine drinkers are 30 percent less likely to have a heart attack. Drinking red wine in moderation means one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65 and up to two drinks a day for men 65 and younger. Men have a higher limit because they typically weigh more and have more alcohol metabolizes enzymes than women.

When five randomly selected Marshall University students both male and female were asked if they preferred white or red wine more, four out of the five said red. “I liked red wine before I knew it was better for me,” said senior psychology major Kenna Smith. “Now, that I know it’s healthy for me is just a bonus.”

Resveratrol can also be found in grapes, peanuts and blueberries. According to The University of California Berkeley Wellness, almost 4,000 studies have been published in recent years. Studies suggest resveratrol may help protect the body from cardiovascular disease by acting like an antioxidant. According to Berkeley Wellness it is not known to what extent resveratrol is involved with disease protection.

Resveratrol has been tested on animals such as mice and the results have been promising. Collected animal data on the prevention of cancers, heart diseases and diabetes specify that there should be more trials done on humans.

New studies are underway and most resveratrol supplements being used appear to be safe, but their long-term effects are questionable. Until those questions are answered it is better to get the daily-recommended amount of resveratrol from grapes, nuts, and a daily glass of red wine.

Logan Parkulo can be contacted at [email protected]

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