MU Indian Student Association to celebrate heritage with Holi Festival

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The Indian Student Association will present Marshall University’s first Holi festival 7 p.m., May 15 on the MU INTO lawn between Prichard Hall and Gullickson Hall.
The festival is a collaboration between Marshall INTO, Student Government Association, Housing and Residence Life and Coca-Cola.
Holi, also known as the festival of colors and the festival of love, is traditionally a two-day ceremony based on two ancient Hindu legends.
The first legend concerns King Hiranyakashipu and his sister Holika.
The name “Holi” derives from Holika, and this myth is the basis of the festival of colors.
“After Holika has burned up, the ashes were remaining,” said Vinay Kumar Raj, vice president of the Indian Student Association. “So people came to the spot and they took the ashes and spread them over their faces and body. In history, the ashes have changed into different colors. This is how the Holi festival of colors originated.”
The second revolves around the love between Krishna and Radha, providing the backdrop for the festival of love.
The modern celebration of Holi focuses on the celebratory aspects, often painting oneself and others with colors, and dancing with friends and family.
Holi was established as a Hindu holiday, but the biggest Holi festival takes place in Salt Lake City, Utah.
Holi commemorates the arrival of spring and the happiness that comes along with the season.
The colors involved in the celebration are made of natural materials such as flowers and seeds.
Unity is also an important aspect of the celebration, which is a time when family and friends come together.
“We play colors as a symbol of unity,” said Jagan Pagala, public relations officer for the Indian Student Association. “All the people get together at one point and celebrate with joy.”
The goal of the Indian Student Association is to have as many Marshall students as possible attend the festival to have fun and learn about a culture they may be unfamiliar with.
“We want everyone on the campus to come and enjoy and see something new that has never happened at the university,” Pagala said.
Jared Casto can be contacted at [email protected]

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