‘Better’ is not good enough because #BlackLivesMatter

Racism and brutality in police forces need to keep gaining attention until it is nationally eradicated.

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‘Better’ is not good enough because #BlackLivesMatter

In this Baltimore Sun video, Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts, along with Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake,  discusses the events leading up to the death of Freddie Gray. Batts said on behalf of the police department, “we will get better.”

In this Baltimore Sun video, Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts, along with Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, discusses the events leading up to the death of Freddie Gray. Batts said on behalf of the police department, “we will get better.”

Screenshot

In this Baltimore Sun video, Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts, along with Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, discusses the events leading up to the death of Freddie Gray. Batts said on behalf of the police department, “we will get better.”

Screenshot

Screenshot

In this Baltimore Sun video, Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts, along with Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, discusses the events leading up to the death of Freddie Gray. Batts said on behalf of the police department, “we will get better.”

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A Baltimore man has died from a spinal injury following his arrest, but the problem is that no one knows how he got these injuries.

Police say when Freddie Gray was arrested and put into a police van April 13, he was able to speak, but when he was taken out of the van 30 minutes later, he could not talk or breathe. He was in the hospital for a week before he died.

Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts said on behalf of the police department, “we will get better.”

But is “better” really good enough?

We don’t need police forces to “get better,” we need them to collectively stop police brutality entirely.

The misconduct of the police is clear in the multiple cell phone videos that have surfaced of the arrest. One video shows Gray being dragged by the police, appearing to be physically in pain: he was screaming and was visibly limp.

It is very unclear as to why Gray was being pursued by the police in the first place, but Gray allegedly had a switchblade on him at the time, which is not necessarily a crime and does not serve as a viable probable cause for pursuit.

Gray’s case is only the most recent case of a black individual dying at police officer’s hands, and is just a reminder that black lives still matter.

Protests in Ferguson are still happening, and the #BlackLivesMatter campaign is still alive, well and very relevant.

Racism and brutality in police forces need to keep gaining attention until it is nationally eradicated.

Until then, though, yelling and screaming about it is apparently the only way to keep the issue at the surface, and even then, that may not do much. The people of Ferguson are still making lots of noise, and the media coverage has slowly fizzled out.

No amount of activism is going to bring back Michael Brown, Trayvon Martin, Freddie Gray or anyone else, but it will hopefully lead to the appropriate steps it will take for everyone to feel protected by our hardworking police forces, rather than fearing them.

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