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Soul Food Feast honors Black History Month

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Traditional soul foods such as fried chicken, barbeque ribs, chitterlings (chitlins), cornbread, mac and cheese, collard greens, sweet potatoes and other dishes will be served.

Pastor+Deonte+Jackson+of+First+Baptist+Church+of+Huntington%2C+left+and+Priscilla+Adjei-Baffour%2C+pharmacy+student+enjoy+dinner+during+the+Center+for+African+American+Studies%E2%80%99+Soul+Food+Fest+Feb.+9%2C+2014+in+the+Memorial+Student+Center.
Pastor Deonte Jackson of First Baptist Church of Huntington, left and Priscilla Adjei-Baffour, pharmacy student enjoy dinner during the Center for African American Studies’ Soul Food Fest Feb. 9, 2014 in the Memorial Student Center.

Pastor Deonte Jackson of First Baptist Church of Huntington, left and Priscilla Adjei-Baffour, pharmacy student enjoy dinner during the Center for African American Studies’ Soul Food Fest Feb. 9, 2014 in the Memorial Student Center.

Emily Rice

Emily Rice

Pastor Deonte Jackson of First Baptist Church of Huntington, left and Priscilla Adjei-Baffour, pharmacy student enjoy dinner during the Center for African American Studies’ Soul Food Fest Feb. 9, 2014 in the Memorial Student Center.

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Marshall University is honoring Black History Month with the annual Soul Food Feast at 2 p.m. Sunday in the John Marshall Dining Room.

Maurice Cooley, associate vice president of intercultural affairs, said the event has been sponsored by the Center for African-American Students for more than 25 years.

“Among several of the celebrations for Black History Month, this is one of the most enjoyable for the community,” Cooley said.

Traditional soul foods such as fried chicken, barbeque ribs, chitterlings (chitlins), cornbread, mac and cheese, collard greens, sweet potatoes and other dishes will be served.

This strengthens the cohesion of the family.”

— Maurice Cooley

“For hundreds of years African-Americans have been faith-oriented people,” Cooley said. Cooley said traditionally an African-American family would congregate at Grandma’s after church for dinner and these are the foods that would be served.

“This strengthens the cohesion of the family,” Cooley said.

The event is celebrated during Black History Month, not only because it is an African-American tradition, but also because soul foods originated with slavery.

When a plantation family ate pig and threw the body away, there were still edible parts left over and slaves would cook the intestines.

The final meal is called chitterlings, or chitlins. This technique is still used today.

The event gives students on campus an opportunity to skip the dining hall and have a home-cooked, buffet style meal.

Adult tickets are $15, and children and student tickets are $7.

Caitlin Fowlkes can be contacted at [email protected]

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