Lady Valor shares her story with packed room

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Lady Valor shares her story with packed room

University community in the John Deaver Drinko Library Tuesday.

University community in the John Deaver Drinko Library Tuesday.

Andrea Steele

University community in the John Deaver Drinko Library Tuesday.

Andrea Steele

Andrea Steele

University community in the John Deaver Drinko Library Tuesday.

“We don’t need surgeries. It all comes down to who you are in spirit.”

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“Lady Valor: The Kristin Beck Story” was shown Tuesday in the John Deaver Drinko Library. The documentary tells the story of Kristin Beck, former U.S. Navy SEAL, and her journey living as a transgender woman.

Marshall student Chloe Holley said the film was interesting and showed a lot about what Beck went through.

“She really showed how brave she is with everything she’s gone through, what she struggles with and is still facing now,” Holley said.

The film opened with transgender women introducing themselves before showing Kristin Beck.

“Lady Valor” chronicles the struggles and feelings of freedom that come as Beck’s life changes. It gives an inside look at Beck’s everyday life.

Director of Classics Eric Del Chrol said Beck gets the audience to look at more than her story.

There needs to be a change, a fundamental change, of compassion in our country. I’ve seen so much of this pain and bullying. It’s not right.”

— Kristin Beck

“I think what makes her story so complex is the way she gets us to look to the inner humanity in all of us,” Chrol said.

The film reveals the feelings and reactions of Beck’s family and coworkers.

“This whole thing you’re doing… I want you to be happy,” Travis Lively, Navy SEAL, said in the film. “I’m here for any team, guy or girl.”

The film shows real footage of Christopher Beck in training. It also shows Kristin Beck’s reaction to bigots and online bullying.

“There needs to be a change, a fundamental change, of compassion in our country,” Beck said. “I’ve seen so much of this pain and bullying. It’s not right.”

Beck said it was hard growing up in the 60s and 70s before society was flexible dealing with gender differences.

“She knew she was a woman since she was in second or third grade,” Holley said. “She didn’t have any kind of outlet back then. In this day and age, it’s a lot easier for all gender types to find a way to be themselves.”

Beck gave the audience an opportunity to ask questions during a Q&A session.

She encouraged the audience to see the beauty in everyone. Beck said she believes the world will be a better place when we see this beauty, give each other a break and start loving one another.

Beck said she wants the world to see she is still the same person.

“I want people to understand this is the same face that was under the beard,“ Beck said. “We don’t need surgeries. It all comes down to who you are in spirit.”

Hannah Harman can be contacted at [email protected]

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