“Pastorale: Woodwinds of the 19th Century”

Three. Two. One. The lights dim and the auditorium grows silent as the melodies of the piano, flute and oboe blend together as one to begin the journey of the “Pastorale: Woodwinds of the 19th Century.”

Oboist Dr. Richard Kravchak, flutist Wendell Dobbs and pianist Henning Vauth join as a trio on stage at the Smith Recital Hall on Marshall’s campus to honor the musician’s that came from a time before them.

The piano is the first to break the silence with an upbeat arrangement by Rossini called “William Tell.”

Dobbs, accompanied by Vauth, then continues the evening with classic pieces by Joachim Anderson.

Dobb’s wife, Professor Linda Dobbs, said her husband has been preparing for this concert night and that he enjoys being a part of this performance.

“It certainly lived up to my expectations and I’ve heard half of it in the living room for a number of months,” Linda Dobbs said. “It was really lovely. I know they both are very interested in playing this music on the instruments that the composers had and the performers had at that time.”

The performance goes on as heads nod to the swift movement of each note and smiles generate from this work of art that is unfolding with every beat of the music.

The harmonious sounds of the flute rise and fall as waves of emotion fill the auditorium.

“It certainly lived up to my expectations and I’ve heard half of it in the living room for a number of months.” ”

— Linda Dobbs

Dobb’s fades out to Andersen’s “Tarantella” as Kravchak is once again welcomed back to the stage to perform Robert Schumann’s “Three Romances.”

Kravchak brings alongside him two oboes that differ in style, but that are both unique and contain an essence that can not only be heard, but felt.

“I like to think of this as the instrumental equivalent of a tricked out Cadillac Escalade and who wouldn’t want to drive in a tricked out Cadillac Escalade?” Kravchak said while referring to the first oboe he played. “I like to think of this one as the oboe equivalent of a horse. So one might ask why in the world would you take a horse to work when you can take a tricked out Escalade. Well, the answer is a horse will take you places that a Escalade won’t.”

Suddenly, melodies begin to flow and peace is brought to the forefront as Kravchak continues with Schumann’s work.

The three musicians featuring “Pastorale” then bring the performance to a closing with a combined performance.

Three. Two. One. The lights appear through the darkness and the auditorium fills with applause as the melodies of the piano, flute and oboe blend together as one to draw an end to the journey of the “Pastorale: Woodwinds of the 19th Century.”

Chantil Foster can be contacted at [email protected]