I woke up like this, and this is beautiful

If the artist was truly concerned with beauty he would not feel the need to morph their bodies into whatever form pleased him at the time.

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In a society obsessed with images and appearance, news has slowly started to criticize Photoshopped photos and the idea of body type as a beauty signifier. But in some ways society has overcompensated for its tendency to body shame and has found itself shaming the size twos and the pimply faces.

Recent headlines featured David Lopera and his plus size celebrity Photoshop tricks. Lopera’s series of images features transformed celebrities with headline-worthy bodies including Katy Perry, Kim Kardashian, Iggy Azalea, Emma Watson and fictional characters such as Ariel from “The Little Mermaid” and Elsa from “Frozen.” The 20-year-old computer technician altered images of the women into plus-size versions of themselves, in some cases adding up to 100 pounds, because he thinks they look more attractive that way.

“Mila Kunis is so much sexier with chunky thighs and a bulging belly,” Lopera told Daily Mail. “These women look much better when they’re overweight.”

Lopera defeats his own intention with such a statement. Just as the same groups of stars are so often altered to look skinnier to match a certain aesthetic, Lopera changed their bodies to fit his own preferences.

Beyoncé as an artist represents confidence for every person, regardless of appearance, class, color, etc. To take the photos of her imperfect skin and critique them destroys that purpose.”

If the artist was truly concerned with beauty he would not feel the need to morph their bodies into whatever form pleased him at the time.

In another example, unretouched photos from Beyoncé’s 2013 L’Oreal campaign leaked last week causing an Internet uproar and a buzzing Bey Hive. The images show the “Flawless” singer with uneven skin and blemishes on her face.

Basically the photos reveal Beyoncé as a real human being without perfect skin who is still arguably one of the most beautiful people on the planet. Criticizing the picture goes against everything the woman stands for.

Beyoncé as an artist represents confidence for every person, regardless of appearance, class, color, etc. To take the photos of her imperfect skin and critique them destroys that purpose.

These examples combined with other massively consumed pieces of popular culture—Meghan Trainor’s “All About That Bass,” for example—give the perception society is moving toward acceptance, but it could not be further from the truth.

Lopera’s images represent his subjects’ bodies as not good enough as they are, fat or skinny. Beyoncé’s unretouched photo as breaking news reveals a culture of people who cannot cope with imperfections.

Society would like to believe it is heading in the right direction, toward a culture that does not shame a woman for not being a size two supermodel with perfect skin and hair. But it has yet to realize the true “right direction” has more to do with acceptance of all sizes, shapes, colors and textures.

Bodies are not newsworthy, and until we reach that point, we will never truly be an accepting society.

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