Obama confronts sexual violence at Grammys, and we couldn’t be happier that he did so

Sunday’s Grammy awards included a video of the president talking about the importance of sexual violence awareness.

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Obama confronts sexual violence at Grammys, and we couldn’t be happier that he did so

Obama brings his message against sexual violence to the stars Sunday at the Grammys and encourages them to join in his campaign to end it. “It’s not okay. It has to stop,” he said.

Obama brings his message against sexual violence to the stars Sunday at the Grammys and encourages them to join in his campaign to end it. “It’s not okay. It has to stop,” he said.

Screenshot

Obama brings his message against sexual violence to the stars Sunday at the Grammys and encourages them to join in his campaign to end it. “It’s not okay. It has to stop,” he said.

Screenshot

Screenshot

Obama brings his message against sexual violence to the stars Sunday at the Grammys and encourages them to join in his campaign to end it. “It’s not okay. It has to stop,” he said.

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President Obama is continuing his fight against sexual violence, this time reaching out to the stars of the Grammys.

Sunday’s Grammy awards included a video of the president talking about the importance of sexual violence awareness.

The video was an advertisement for Obama’s “It’s On Us” campaign against campus sexual violence, launched in September 2014.

In his message, Obama stressed to artists the power of their influence over their fans.

“Artists have the unique power to change minds and attitudes, and get us thinking and talking about what matters,” Obama said. “And all of us, in our own lives, have the power to set an example.”

Artists have the unique power to change minds and attitudes, and get us thinking and talking about what matters.”

— President Obama

Obama has done an excellent job addressing this very relevant and very important issue to the American people, especially amongst a Congress full of old white men who honestly think women can be “asking for it” when they wear certain clothes, or that rape can be “a blessing” if a child results from the incident.

Directly following Obama’s message, Brooke Axtell, a survivor of sexual violence spoke about her experience. Axtell is the director of communications for Allies Against Slavery. She briefly recalled her account of abuse in her speech, offering advice to those who feel helpless.

“Authentic love does not devalue another human being,” Axtell said. “Authentic love does not silence, shame or abuse. If you are in a relationship with someone who does not honor or respect you, I want you to know that you are worthy of love. Please reach out for help. Your voice will save you. Let it extend into the night. Let it part the darkness. Let it set you free to know who you truly are. Valuable. Beautiful. Loved.”

Katy Perry performed her song “By the Grace of God” to complete the Grammy Awards’ small act of advocacy.

However small the segment was, sexual violence of any kind is a pertinent issue that needs to be prioritized and kept at the surface until it is stopped. Public figures should take it upon themselves to advocate against sexual violence until women feel safe walking down the streets, until people can drink without worrying about date rape drugs and until girls all over the world are safe from human trafficking.

In the words of the president himself, “It’s not okay, and it has to stop.”

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