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The University of Louisville men’s basketball team is in the middle of a huge sex scandal.

Allegations are being reported in a book written by 1 of the women allegedly hired to give sexual favors to young recruits to the basketball program.

This brings into question the corruption involved in not only college sports recruiting, but in recruitment for every sports team out there.

The fact that this scandal is not all that shocking just shows you that there’s a serious problem with the way that some colleges take recruitment to the extreme.

In 2013-14, the Louisville team grossed $89.4 million in revenue. They are ranked as one of the top valued basketball programs in the country by Forbes magazine.

Many believe that this scandal is going to lead boosters of the university to invest their money elsewhere and will make parents weary of enrolling their children in the school.

Why are we resting the value of the university on the shoulders of the sports program? When did the value of the basketball team become more important than the value of an education there?

While this is a very important issue because it reveals corruption involved in the college sports recruitment process, this issue alone should not affect university attendance. Sadly, however, this issue may cause enrollment rates at Louisville to drop drastically.

The woman who authored the book detailing the scandal allegedly prostituted her own daughters out to the recruits as well, but hardly anyone is discussing that issue.

This story does not only affect the boys recruited for that team. It spans a much broader range of topics. It brings into question prohibited behavior among young people of both sexes.

Just how much this scandal is going to harm the university’s reputation in the future is still being determined. Maybe the issue lies in how much pressure we put on college teams to be the absolute best to bring in investors when we should be focusing on what colleges are really meant to do: education.

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