EDITORIAL: Earth more important than economy

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EDITORIAL: Earth more important than economy

Protestors attempt to engage local passers by (left: Mark Connelly, left-center: Barbara Garnett, right: Charles Britz).

Protestors attempt to engage local passers by (left: Mark Connelly, left-center: Barbara Garnett, right: Charles Britz).

Douglas Harding

Protestors attempt to engage local passers by (left: Mark Connelly, left-center: Barbara Garnett, right: Charles Britz).

Douglas Harding

Douglas Harding

Protestors attempt to engage local passers by (left: Mark Connelly, left-center: Barbara Garnett, right: Charles Britz).

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Happy Earth Day: the leader of our country still will not address climate change. President Donald Trump delivered a statement about Earth Day on Monday without once mentioning the destruction happening to our planet. Instead, he chose to praise our country’s economy and reflect on the beauty of the United States. 

While it is nice to recognize the strengths of our economic market and the gorgeous landmarks we have access to, it was certainly not an appropriate time to do so. Especially when that very economy can be a cause for climate change and decreases our natural resources. Sure, President Trump mentioned that environmental protection is important, but that was it. There was no inclusion of just what exactly is happening to Earth because of climate change or how to reverse some of the damage, if possible. 

People do what they can to help our planet, but sadly, it is not enough. We cannot hope to save our planet unless world leaders, politicians and corporations agree that climate change is a terrifying reality. Though humans are contributing significantly to climate change, it is corporations and industries that are mostly responsible for an increase in greenhouse gases and pollution.

After the tragic fire of the Notre Dame Cathedral, celebrities and organizations pledged to donate money, and they raised over one billion dollars for restoration purposes. The loss of art and culture is devasting, but the loss of our planet is even worse. That billion dollars could have done so much for Earth, such as cleaning our oceans and beaches and ridding them of pollution.

Climate change is scary, but here are things we can all do as students to show our earth some love:

Take the bus. Marshall University has a great bus system available for students, free with MUID. 

Turn off the lights and open your blinds and curtains. Choose natural light to study in your apartments or dorms. Or better yet, take your homework outside on nice days. 

Marshall’s Sustainability Department provides on campus recycling, student gardens and conservation methods that anyone may get involved with. 

If possible, use cold water when doing laundry and hang clothes on clothesline to dry.

Reusable straws made of metal are a great alternative to plastic ones. 

Lastly, just love and respect our home planet. It’s the only one we have. We can agree with President Trump about the beauty of our country, but we must protect it too. 

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